Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)

Hyperbaric comes from the Greek where “hyper” means more and “baric” relates to pressure.  This amounts to “more pressure.”  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy allows a patient to absorb up to 4 times the normal amount of oxygen.  This increases the oxygenation of all organs, tissues, and body fluids.  It is the pressure of the chamber that allows for the much greater absorption of the oxygen provided.

Breathing 100% pure oxygen outside the chamber will not significantly increase your oxygen uptake by the cells at all.  When a patient is in the chamber, the increased pressure causes the blood plasma, and other liquids of the body, to absorb much larger quantities of oxygen, greatly increasing oxygen uptake by the cells, tissues, glands, organs, brain, and all fluids of the body.  This oxygen can then be utilized by the body for vital functions.

HVM Treatments

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy or “HBOT” is most often used as an “adjunctive treatment.”  This means that is employed in conjunction with other forms of pet health care and is a part of the total medical treatment package or care regime.

HVM (Hyperbaric Veterinary Medicine), utilizes oxygen, provided at optimal levels can have profound anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and tissue healing benefits.  It can accelerate healing dramatically and assist in conditions where there is an oxygen deficit.

 

Conditions which HBOT has shown a good success rate:

  • ​• Severe skin and tissue damage
  • ​• Fracture healing
  • ​• Major systemic or local infections
  • ​• Intervertebral disc herniation
  • ​• Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis
  • ​• Nerve damage
  • ​• Post-surgical swelling and recovery
  • ​• Acute ischemic conditions
  • ​• Infectious conditions such as severe wound infection
  • ​• Some aspects of neurological degeneration
  • ​• Problem wound such as burns, ulcers, gangrene and necrosis
  • ​• Stimulating new bone cell activity
  • ​• Brain/nerve damage
  • ​• Arthritis

HVM Procedure

The patient is placed into the chamber where 100% oxygen flows to a maximum of 2 atmospheric pressure. Oxygen delivered to the patient in the hyperbaric chamber is inhaled and absorbed by the body at pressure many times greater than when breathing oxygen at normal sea level pressure.

Under hyperbaric pressure, healing oxygen is dissolved in the blood plasma, cerebrospinal and lymph fluids, enabling oxygen to reach damaged tissue 3 to 4 times farther than normally diffused by red blood cells.